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At Farm Show, New Data Reveals Pennsylvania Businesses Paying Massive Increase In Tariffs As Exports Plummet

Pennsylvania businesses have now paid an extra $271 million in import tariffs due to Trump tariffs 

Most recent monthly data shows Pennsylvania businesses have paid $95 million in tariffs on products subject to new Trump tariffs; more than nine times what was paid on the same products last year

Pennsylvania exports are also paying the price for trade war: exports subject to retaliation down 20%, thanks to $118 million in new retaliatory tariffs

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
CONTACT: [email protected] or [email protected] Harrisburg, PA – Record-high tariffs are hitting Pennsylvania hard, according to new data released yesterday at the Pennsylvania Farm Show by Tariffs Hurt the Heartland and compiled by The Trade Partnership. The data includes the first look at the full weight of tariffs that have been imposed on $200 billion in Chinese imports and the resulting retaliatory actions taken against American exports. In October 2018 (the most recent month available), Pennsylvania businesses paid $95 million in tariffs on products subject to Trump administration tariffs – more than nine times the amount paid in tariffs on the same products a year ago. Since new tariffs were imposed, Pennsylvania businesses have paid an extra $271 million in import tariffs.

See the Pennsylvania State Impact Report HERE for more information.

The record-setting Pennsylvania numbers correspond with new national data showing American businesses paid $6.2 billion in tariffs in October, the highest amount for any month in U.S. history.

“Tariffs are taking a toll on Pennsylvania farmers, workers, manufacturers, business owners and families,” said Farmers for Free Trade Co-Founder, Angela Hofmann. “Tariffs cost jobs, drive up prices, and make it harder for businesses to keep their doors open. The data shows that the trade war has failed to achieve any of the administration’s goals, but the costs continue to pile up in Pennsylvania and across the country.”

Though tariffs are billed by the administration as a way to reduce the trade deficit, export numbers reveal that the opposite is happening. Since the trade war began, Pennsylvania exports have faced $118 million in new retaliatory tariffs, including $35 million in October. As a result, Pennsylvania exports subject to retaliation have dropped 20 percent.

“Farmers rely on exports, but tariffs are making it harder for them to sell their commodities and making it easier for foreign competitors to take over export markets that Americans worked for years to develop,” Angela Hofmann added. “The damage caused to American agriculture by the trade war could be irreparable if the administration continues on its course.”

The data was released at the Pennsylvania Farm Show in Harrisburg. At the event, Tariffs Hurt the Heartland held a discussion featuring Farmers for Free Trade, the Pennsylvania State Grange and the Pennsylvania Farm Bureau.

Part of a larger series, the data released today is the latest segment of the monthly Tariff Tracker that Tariffs Hurt the Heartland has launched in conjunction with The Trade Partnership, who compiles monthly data released by the U.S. government. The monthly import data is calculated using data from the Census Bureau, and the monthly export data is compiled based on Census Bureau and U.S. Department of Agriculture data. As part of the Tariff Tracker project, Tariffs Hurt the Heartland is releasing data on how individual states have been impacted by increased import tariffs and declining exports.

Tariffs Hurt the Heartland is the nationwide, non-partisan campaign opposing tariffs that is supported by more than 150 trade associations from every industry. Tariffs Hurt the Heartland has been holding town hall meetings on the tariff impact of tariffs in communities across the country. The campaign is also airing ads across 11 states in the Midwest that describe the impact of tariff increases on consumers and has launched an interactive map tracking the tariff impact on American employers.

For additional information and data from the Tariff Tracker contact [email protected] or [email protected].

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Farmers for Free Trade Statement on CPTPP Going into Effect and the Competitive Disadvantage it Creates for American Farmers

Sheridan, WY – Today, Brian Kuehl, Co-Executive Director of Farmers for Free Trade, the nationwide campaign to support trade policy that opens markets for American farmers and ranchers, released the following statement as the the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership (CPTPP) went into effect for six of its eleven members. Farmers for Free Trade is a bipartisan campaign co-chaired by former Senator Baucus and former Senator Richard Lugar (R-IN).

“Today marks the beginning of an era of lost opportunity for American farmers and ranchers. While America stands on the sidelines, countries that directly compete with our farmers – including Mexico, Canada, Australia and New Zealand – will begin to receive the tariff-free benefits of a trade agreement the U.S. once stood at the center of.

 “U.S. beef, poultry, grains, dairy and so many other commodities will be at an immediate disadvantage starting today. Our farmers and ranchers will continue to be at a competitive disadvantage until we reengage with trading partners across the globe and rejoin the many nations that are providing their farmers with the benefits of multilateral trade agreements like CPTPP.

 “Particularly at a time when we are looking for ways to ensure China competes on a level playing field, the United States needs to be the one setting the rules in vast new markets for our exports, including Asia. We will continue to push the Administration and lawmakers on both sides of the aisle to fight for our farmers by catching up with the rest of the world on trade.” 

CONTACT: [email protected]

 

Tariffs Paid By Louisiana Businesses Have Increased Eightfold, According to Data Released at a Town Hall with Former Congressman Dr. Charles Boustany

Most recent monthly data shows Louisiana businesses paid $19 million in tariffs on products subject to new Trump tariffs during October; more than eight times what was paid on the same products last year

Louisiana businesses have now paid an extra $85 million in import tariffs

Louisiana exports are also paying the price for trade war, as local farmers and manufacturers have faced $39 million in new retaliatory tariffs on goods exported out of the state

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

CONTACT: [email protected] or [email protected]

(LAFAYETTE, LA) – A group of representatives from Louisiana’s business and manufacturing community joined Tariffs Hurt the Heartland, a nationwide grassroots campaign against tariffs, at a town hall today to reveal new economic data detailing the impact of tariffs on the state’s economy. The townhall was moderated by former Louisiana Congressman Dr. Charles Boustany, who now serves as a spokesman for the grassroots campaign.

The data, compiled by the Trade Partnership, shows that tariffs cost Louisiana businesses $19 million in October. That is over eight times the tariffs paid on those same products in October 2017.

“Tariffs are taxes and Louisianan businesses, families and workers are being hit harder than ever before,” said Tariffs Hurt the Heartland spokesperson and former Congressman Charles Boustany. “I fought for the people of Lafayette and Louisiana for 12 years in Congress. Now I’m fighting to make sure that the administration’s disastrous tariff policies don’t make it harder for local business to hire workers and keep their doors open.”

The town hall featured panelists representing Louisiana’s business and manufacturing communities as well as several trade experts who discussed how these tariffs are impacting their consumers, their ability to invest in their businesses, their exports, and the impact on jobs and hiring.

“The biggest impact we’ve noticed is in the energy sector, which relies on imported steel and aluminum for things as varied as offshore platform applications to building materials for large LNG facilities,” said Eddy Hayes, a trade attorney at Leake & Andersson LLP and Chair of the World Trade Center of New Orleans. “We’ve witnessed a chilling effect in the energy sector due to both uncertainty of supply chain availability and significantly increased pricing for materials that are available.”

The town hall was held at the Petroleum Club of Lafayette, and the full list of speakers included:

  • The Honorable Dr. Charles Boustany
  • Mr. Edward T. Hayes, International Trade Attorney/Chair, WTCNO Policy Committee
  • Mr. Robert M. Landry, Vice President & Chief Commercial Officer, Port of New Orleans
  • Mrs. Andy Begneaud, Partner, Begneaud Manufacturing
  • Mr. Troy Wayman, President & CEO, One Acadiana
  • Mr. Stephen Waguspack, President and CEO, Louisiana Association of Business and Industry
  • Ms. Angela Marshall Hofmann, Co-Founder, Farmers for Free Trade

The Louisiana numbers correspond with new national data showing American businesses paid $6.2 billion in tariffs in October, the highest amount for any month in U.S. history. The data, which runs through October 2018 (the most recent month available) and is drawn from U.S. Census Bureau statistics on tariffs, includes the first look at the full weight of tariffs that have been imposed on $200 billion in Chinese imports and the impacts of retaliation from that action.

Tariffs Hurt the Heartland is the nationwide, non-partisan campaign opposing tariffs that is supported by more than 150 trade associations from every industry. Tariffs Hurt the Heartland has been holding town hall meetings on the tariff impact of tariffs in communities across the country. The campaign is also airing ads across 11 states that describe the impact of tariff increases on consumers and has launched an interactive map tracking the tariff impact on American employers.

For additional information and data from the Tariff Tracker contact [email protected] or [email protected].

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New Tariff Data Shows October Was the Highest Tariffed Month in U.S. History

U.S. businesses paid $6.2 billion in tariffs in October including $2.8 billion in new tariffs on products that have been targeted by the Trump Administration 

Data shows that tariffs have failed to achieve any stated Administration goals: US imports subject to new tariffs declined by just 0.6% in October, while US exports subject to retaliation fell 37%; Businesses are still importing goods while paying higher taxes, exports are falling, trade deficit is growing

Tariffs Hurt the Heartland spokesman Charles Boustany: “The numbers don’t lie. Americans are paying these taxes and they’re paying more than ever before.”

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Contact: [email protected] or [email protected] (Washington, D.C.) – New data released today by Tariffs Hurt the Heartland and compiled by The Trade Partnership from monthly U.S. government data shows an unprecedented increase in import tariffs and falling U.S. exports due to new tariffs and international retaliation. The data, which is drawn from U.S. Census statistics on tariffs, includes the first look at the full weight of tariffs that have been imposed on $200 billion in Chinese imports and the impacts of retaliation from that action. The data shows that the $6.2 billion in tariffs paid by U.S.businesses in October 2018 is the highest monthly amount in U.S. history. It is also more than double what businesses paid in tariffs in October last year. “The numbers don’t lie,” said Tariffs Hurt the Heartland spokesman and former Congressman Charles Boustany. Americans are paying these taxes and they’re paying more than ever before. These tariffs are not making our country wealthier, they are doing the exact opposite. This data shows that tariffs have been an unmitigated failure in achieving any of the Administration’s goals. All that’s happening is businesses and consumers are paying more, American exports subject to retaliation are rapidly declining, and the deficit the Administration cares so much about is ballooning” Today’s data shows that the Administration tariff policy has failed to achieve any of its stated goals and has, in fact,helped to grow the trade deficit that the Administration has prioritized addressing. The data shows that US imports subject to new tariffs declined just 0.6% in October, while US exports subject to retaliation fell 37%. In other words, U.S. businesses are still importing goods, they are just being taxed more, while exports are falling on those products that have been targeted by retaliatory tariffs. This trend is even more prominent when it comes to data for China 301 tariffs: US imports subject to Section 301 tariffs increased by 2% in October, while US exports subject to 301 retaliation plummeted 42%. “We are now seeing the raw data behind the stories of tariff pain that are coming in from every corner of the country,” former Congressman Boustany added. “American businesses, farmers, manufacturers and consumers are suffering under the weight of the current tariffs and are reeling from the continued uncertainty over whether they will be increased even further.” The Tariff Tracker: The data released today is part of a monthly Tariff Tracker that Tariffs Hurt the Heartland has launched in conjunction with The Trade Partnership, who compiles monthly data released by the U.S. government. The monthly import data is calculated using data from the Census Bureau. The monthly export data is compiled based on Census Bureau and U.S. Department of Agriculture data. As part of the Tariff Tracker project, Tariffs Hurt the Heartland is releasing data on how individual states have been impacted by increased import tariffs and declining exports. Tariffs Hurt the Heartland is the nationwide, non-partisan campaign opposing tariffs that is supported by over 150 trade associations from every industry. Tariffs Hurt the Heartland has been holding town hall meetings on the tariff impact in communities across the country. The campaign is also airing ads across 11 states in the Midwest that describe the impact of tariff increases on consumers and has launched an interactive map tracking the tariff impact on American employers. More details on October 2018 Tariff Tracker data: Imports: Overall: Tariffs cost American companies $6.2 billion in October. Tariffs paid increased $3.1 billion (104%) compared to October 2017, despite an increase of just 13% in the value of imports.
Trump Tariffs: Trump administration tariffs cost American companies an extra $2.8 billion in October. Products subject to the Trump administration actions currently in place faced $3.2 billion in tariffs in October, compared to just $407 million in October 2017. The large increase in tariffs came despite a slight decline in the value of imports.
China 301: China Section 301 tariffs cost American companies about $2.2 billion in October. Products subject to the Section 301 remedies faced $2.6 billion in tariffs in October, compared to just $394 million in October 2017. This is the first month reflecting 10% “List 3” tariffs, which could rise to 25% unless the United States and China reach a deal during their 90-day negotiation period.
Steel and Aluminum 232 Tariffs: Section 232 steel tariffs alone have cost American companies $2.3 billion, including $446 million in October. These products were all duty free before the Section 232 tariffs went into effect in March. Section 232 aluminum tariffs alone cost American companies about$124 million in October. Aluminum products subject to the Section 232 remedies faced $134 million in tariffs in October, compared to just $10 million in October 2017. The large increase in tariffs came despite a 4% decrease in the value of imports. Steel Tariffs:
Aluminum Tariffs:

Georgia Faces 35% Increase in Tariff Costs, According to New Data Released at Atlanta Town Hall with Farmers and Business Owners

As President Trump prepares for major meeting on tariff negotiations at G20, American small businesses in Atlanta share their stories of being hurt by tariffs

ATLANTA, GA – A group of representatives from Georgia’s agriculture and small business communities joined Tariffs Hurt the Heartland, a nationwide grassroots campaign against tariffs, at a town hall today to debut new economic data detailing the impact of tariffs on the state’s economy.

The data, compiled by the Trade Partnership, shows that tariffs cost Georgia businesses almost $205 million in September. That represents a 35 percent increase in tariff-related costs since the same point last year—even though the value of imports increased by just six percent over that period.

“These tariffs are hitting Georgians where it hurts the most. Retaliatory tariffs on Georgia exports have skyrocketed since August and are putting pressure on multiple industries from peanuts to seafood. Retailers are also beginning to feel the pain and fear what the new year might bring when tariffs increase to 25 percent,” added Angela Hofmann, co-founder of Farmers for Free Trade.

The Trade Partnership data also shows that Georgia exports were subject to more than $46 million in retaliatory tariffs, thanks to ongoing trade disputes. These costs weigh heavily on the shoulders of farmers, retailers, small business owners, employers and workers who support Georgia’s economy – those the administration promised to safeguard with its trade policies.

The town hall featured panelists representing integral branches of Georgia’s economy, including agriculture, retail, and small business, as well as trade experts.

“The harm from tariffs goes beyond just the direct effect of higher costs for imports. We’ve heard from a number of startups and small businesses that tariffs are having a negative impact on the broader business environment as they seek new customers and partnerships globally,” said Executive Director of the National Foreign Trade Council’s Global Innovation Forum, Jake Colvin. 

“The retail industry is vital to the success of Georgia’s economy and communities. We are concerned about the impact that tariffs are having on the price and availability of the millions of products that consumers need. These tariffs have led to higher prices resulting in decreased buying power and will likely lead to a loss of jobs for Georgia families,” said Director of Government Affairs for Georgia Retailers, Thomas D. Beusse.

“The restaurant industry in Georgia is an industry of opportunity. For many people in the restaurant business, it means a first job. But if the food that restaurants serve is coming in at a higher rate, it’s going to affect restaurants and their ability to keep people employed,” said CEO of the Georgia Restaurant Association, Karen Bremer. 

“The U.S. Food and Drug Administration recommends eating seafood two to three times per week. Tariffs could make seafood become unaffordable for the American consumer,” said President & CEO of King & Prince Seafood, Michael Alexander.

Tariffs Hurt the Heartland is backed by over 100 of the nation’s largest trade organizations that represent thousands of workers and businesses across the country. The campaign recently released an interactive searchable map (TariffsHurt.com) that allows users to find stories across the country of how tariffs are impacting local communities. Learn more about the campaign here, or read about us in the New York Times, Bloomberg, USA Today and the Wall Street Journal. Join the conversation on Twitter using #TariffsHurt.

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New Tariffs on Christmas Lights Arrive Just in Time for the Holiday Season

As President Trump prepares to light the National Christmas Tree, businesses face higher tariffs on a holiday staple 

10 percent tariff on the majority of Christmas lights sold in stores represents another tax on American businesses and consumers; Christmas light tariffs will rise to 25 percent on January 1st 2019

WASHINGTON, DC – The majority of Christmas lights sold across the United States are being hit with a new tariff by the Trump Administration, stemming from the Section 301 tariff dispute. The import tariff is being paid by American businesses who import the product.

Because there are no major American Christmas light manufacturers, nearly all Christmas tree lights are imported. According to U.S. Census data, over 80% of US imports of Christmas lights from the world in 2017 came between August and October as companies stock up for the holiday season, with China accounting for about 85% of those imports. Already subject to 8% Most Favored Nation (MFN) tariffs, the Section 301 dispute added another 10% tariff, to 18% overall. These took effect on September 24 – right in the middle of peak season for increasing holiday inventory. Lights could become even more expensive next Christmas, as the Section 301 tariff will increase to 25% (or an overall rate of 33%) on January 1st 2019.

“This is another instance when these tariffs are nothing more than a tax on businesses and working families,” said Tariffs Hurt the Heartland spokesman, Dr. Charles Boustany. “Raising costs for businesses and consumers during the holidays doesn’t do anything but punish Americans who, polls show, want nothing to do with this trade war. The President should use his upcoming meeting with President Xi to negotiate a deal that ends these tariffs, avoids another round of tariffs on additional consumer products, and avoids the upcoming New Year’s Day tariff hike. Millions of Americans are counting on him to make that deal.”

The Tariffs Hurt the Heartland campaign continues to track the impact of tariffs on individual products, states, and industries. Recent data released by Tariffs Hurt the Heartland and compiled by The Trade Partnership from monthly U.S. government data, shows the dramatic cost increases and export declines the trade war has created for American businesses, farmers, and consumers. The September 2018 data, the most recent month available, shows that American businesses paid $4.4 billion in import tariffs, including a $1.4 billion increase in tariffs on products that have been targeted by Administration tariff actions. The $4.4 billion in tariffs paid in both August and September are unprecedented in U.S. history. Imported products subject to new tariffs by the Trump Administration accounted for nearly all of the increase. The export tariff data released today shows that retaliatory tariffs had an immediate and severe impact on US exports. In September, US exports of products subject to retaliatory tariffs declined by $2.5 billion, or 26 percent, from the previous year. For more visit: http://tariffshurt.com/tariff-tracker-new-data-shows-american-businesses-paying-unprecedented-tariffs-exports-subject-to-retaliation-declining-rapidly/

Tariffs Hurt the Heartland is the nationwide, non-partisan campaign opposing tariffs that is supported by over 140 trade association from every industry. Tariffs Hurt the Heartland has been holding town hall meetings on the tariff impact in communities across the country. The campaign is also airing ads across 11 states in the Midwest that describe the impact of tariff increases on consumers and has launched an interactive map tracking the tariff impact on American employers.

 

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President’s Visit to Tennessee on Sunday Highlights Sting Caused By Latest Wave of Tariffs

Across Tennessee, Businesses, Workers and Families Facing New Taxes Thanks to Recent Trade War Escalation

QUOTE FROM TARIFFS HURT THE HEARTLAND SPOKESMAN BRIAN KUEHL: “The longer this trade war goes on, the worse it will get for Tennessee. Tariffs have already caused long-term damage to farmers who rely on exports to make a living. Their overseas markets are disappearing – possibly for good. Now we are seeing the negative effects throughout Tennessee’s economy. It’s clear that the trade war needs to come to an end before the pain gets any worse.”

HEADLINE: ‘TARIFFS ARE HURTING TENNESSEE.’ “Mexico, Canada and the European Union all imposed tariffs on U.S. whiskey exports in retaliation for President Trump’s steel and aluminum tariffs. And China imposed 25 percent tariffs on U.S. whiskeys in response to the growing trade war between the two nations. … Tennessee farms that export to China and businesses that rely on steel and aluminum imports are being squeezed. Leah Askarinam, with the Washington newsletter Inside Elections, has looked into the impact of tariffs on voters and said a lot of farmers and small businesses in rural red states are concerned.” (Jason Margolis, “Tariffs Are Hurting Tennessee, But Is It Enough To Turn Deep-Red Tennessee Blue?” Public Radio International, 10/28/18)

TENNESSEE HIT HARDER THAN ANY OTHER STATE BY TRADE WAR WITH CHINA

(SOURCE)

MTSU STUDY: AUTO EXPORTS DECLINE AS TRADE WAR HITS TENNESSEE. “Tennessee’s exporters had a somewhat ho-hum second quarter, according to the latest ‘Global Commerce’ report from MTSU’s Business and Economic Research Center. … [BERC Associate Director Steven] Livingston noted that ‘significant declines’ in Tennessee’s shipments to Canada of automobiles and of computers were the major reason for this relatively modest performance.” (Jimmy Hart, “Has the Trade War Hit Tennessee’s Shores?” MTSU Business and Economic Research Center, 10/3/18)

‘THIS COULD BE CATASTROPHIC.’  “Small businesses around the country say they are bracing for the latest round of tariffs, which could cut into already-thin profits and leave them with little recourse but to pass on additional costs to consumers beginning this holiday season. … ‘A 25 percent bump at the wholesale level could end up being a 40 or 50 percent increase by the time something gets to the sales floor,’ said Adam Rossi, owner of Adam Solar Rides … ‘The American consumer just isn’t willing to pay that much more.’ (Abha Bhattarai, “‘This Could Be Catastrophic’: Small Businesses Say New Tariffs Will Make It Even Harder to Compete,” Washington Post, 9/20/18)

TARIFFS MEAN HIGHER PRICES FOR GROCERIES, CLOTHES, FURNITURE, AND A LOT MORE. “The consensus among many American retailers and small business owners is that the tariffs themselves will hurt business — and that the pain will be passed along to American shoppers in the form of higher prices on a vast array of goods. The new tariffs affect imports ranging from canned vegetables to wood furniture, and seem to affect at least some of the products from major consumer brands like Crocs, Nike, Apple, and Procter & Gamble.” (Brad Tuttle, “All The Major Retailers That Say They’ll Have to Raise Prices Because of New Tariffs on China,” Time, 9/26/18)

PRICES WILL SPIKE AS HOLIDAY SHOPPING BEGINS. “Many American companies have already announced that tariffs could force them to raise prices, including Walmart, Gap, Coca-Cola, and General Motors. Macy’s also expects to be affected, and some Apple products are expected to get more expensive as well, although not its new smartwatch or wireless headphones. … ‘There’s no way around it: Tariffs are taxes on American consumers,’ says David French, senior vice president for government relations at the National Retail Federation. He adds that some prices might increase as soon as the holiday shopping season.” (Yoni Blumberg, “Trump’s $250 Billion in China Tariffs Are Now in Effect – Here’s What Could Get More Expensive,” CNBC, 9/25/18)

TENNESSEE MANUFACTURERS SAY TARIFFS MAKE IT IMPOSSIBLE TO COMPETE WITH FOREIGN COMPANIES. “Executives from six area companies employing more than 1,000 Tennesseans described the significant price increases on steel, both domestic and imported, that they said are impairing their ability to compete against foreign companies. According to the Aug. 13 letter, steel prices are the highest they have been since 2008 and they have increased by 43 percent since this time last year. ‘These employees and our businesses depend on access to competitively priced steel to fabricate our products and compete in a global marketplace,’ the leaders wrote. ‘We cannot compete globally when the cost of our most important input has spiked and delivery times are extended.’” (Jamie McGee, “Tennessee Manufacturers Urge Trump to Rescind Steel Tariffs,” Nashville Tennessean, 8/20/18)

TRADE WAR WILL INFLICT MAJOR DAMAGE ON AUTO MANUFACTURING. “The Trump administration’s new tariffs on aluminum and steel and the threat of more duties on imported cars and car parts will weaken the U.S. economy and inflict serious damage on the nation’s auto industry, a panel of trade analysts warned Wednesday. Americans will pay thousands of dollars more for new cars and trucks as a result of the tariffs, and as many as 700,000 workers in the auto industry could lose their jobs, the analysts told a Senate committee.” (Michael Collins, “Tariffs on Imported Cars, Parts Could Harm U.S. Economy and Auto Industry, Experts Warn,” USA Today, 9/5/18)

AUTO INDUSTRY EMPLOYS A THIRD OF TENNESSEE’S MANUFACTURING WORKERS. “In Tennessee, the number of auto jobs has nearly doubled, and exports and family incomes have increased under the North American Free Trade Agreement, which eliminated most tariffs between the United States, Mexico and Canada. A third of the state’s manufacturing workforce is now employed in the automobile industry.” (Michael Collins, “Tariffs on Imported Cars, Parts Could Harm U.S. Economy and Auto Industry, Experts Warn,” USA Today, 9/5/18)

Missouri Continues to Feel Tariff Fallout Ahead of Trump Rally

QUOTE FROM ALAN WEBER, FARMER AND AGRICULTURAL ECONOMIST, MARSHALL, MO: “Tariffs have already done significant damage to Missouri’s agriculture industry – and that’s just part of the story. Across the state, farmers, manufacturers, small businesses, workers, and families are facing increased costs, fewer jobs, and higher prices because of tariffs. Unfortunately, unless the trade war ends, things are going to get a lot worse before they get better.”

TARIFF EFFECT ON MISSOURI IS ‘NOT SUSTAINABLE.’ “’Definitely the tariffs are the biggest negative thing we’ve seen,’ said Adam Jones, a farmer from Old Monroe in Lincoln County. ‘It feels odd to see these prices drop and not have any way to help yourself.’ ‘The main cash crop I grow is soybeans, which has taken the largest hit,’ adds Russell, the farmer from Richmond, Mo. He said his farm is ‘producing our corn and soybeans at negative returns,’ including about a $2 per bushel loss on soybeans. ‘That’s something that’s not sustainable,’ he said.” (Bryce Gray & Andrew Nguyen, “Tariffs and drought weigh heavily on farmers,” St. Louis Post-Dispatch, 10/19/18)

STEEL TARIFFS HIT MISSOURI MANUFACTURERS. “Doug Olds is the vice president of Washington Metal Fabricators in Washington, Missouri. The company buys raw metal from U.S. producers and turns it into finished products for various clients. He told Newsy, ‘For years, we’ve been able to ride the bubble out. Steel market fluctuated minorly, and we just never raised our prices or lowered our prices. … This was such a big hit, we did have to raise prices.’” (Matt Picht & Cliff Judy, “Trump’s Trade War Is Leaving Missourians Bruised, But Not Broken,” Newsy, 10/11/18)

TARIFFS DRIVE SOYBEAN PRICES DOWN. “Patrick Westhoff, director of the Food and Agricultural Policy Research Institute, said that while it is difficult to attribute economic trends to any one factor, the tariffs certainly deserve blame for these dropping soybean prices, and that has been reflected in farmers’ bottom lines. ‘Yes, it has affected U.S. prices. Certainly, the lower prices have reduced income levels for every producer,’ Westhoff said, adding that a Food and Agricultural Policy Research Institute report from August projected the market year average price at $8.73 per soybean bushel, the lowest since 2006. ‘Prices are down roughly 20 percent over the last six months,’ said Christine Tew, director of communications for the Missouri Soybean Association.” (Andrew Withers, “FACT CHECK: How bad off will soybean farmers be this year?” The Columbia Missourian, 10/27/18)

  • “A bumper crop has weighed on soybean prices this year, and trade tariffs already have added pressure on prices of other crops… Soybean futures are down 16 percent since April.” (Lori Ann LaRocco, “Soybean and Pea Farmers Scramble as China and European Trade Missions Cancel Visits,” CNBC, 8/20/18)
  • “Soybeans are the state’s most valuable cash crop, and the export market is hugely important for farmers.” (David Nicklaus, “The Case of the Missing Soybeans, or Why Tariffs’ Missouri Effect Is Being Underestimated,” St. Louis Post Dispatch, 7/3/18)

MISSOURI MANUFACTURER FACING CLOSURE OVER TARIFFS. “Mid Continent Nail employed about 500 workers in Poplar Bluff — population 17,070 — before Trump’s tariffs on Mexican steel took effect in June. Since then, nearly 200 employees have been laid off or left voluntarily. Mid Continent’s facilities could shutter ‘by the end of the month,’ said the company’s spokeswoman, Elizabeth Heaton.” (Allison Kite, “Missouri company facing closure over tariffs is at center of McCaskill, Hawley battle,” The Kansas City Star, 10/14/18)

  • “Trump’s tariff war against America’s trading partners has driven up the cost of imported steel from Mexico by 25 percent. Mid Continent Nail Corp. of Poplar Bluff, Mo., is owned by Mexican company Deacero, which provides its steel. With the tariffs pushing up the price of its nails, the company has lost market share, requiring it to lay off about 100 of its 500-employee workforce; the rest might follow.” (Editorial: “Hawley Chooses the Wrong Side in Trump’s Trade War,” St. Louis Post-Dispatch, 8/23/18)
  • ‘MISSOURI NAIL COMPANY CITES TARIFFS FOR ADDITIONAL LAYOFFS.’ “Mid Continent Nail Corporation in southeast Missouri’s Poplar Bluff has laid off about 160 workers since President Trump’s tariffs on steel and aluminum imports began on June 1. The company now employs fewer than 340 workers, down from about 500 before the tariffs took effect. Temporary workers have been let go and some permanent workers have left for other jobs and have not been replaced.” (Alisa Nelson, “Missouri Nail Comapny Cites Tariffs for Additional Layoffs,” Missourinet, 8/18/18)
  • “Missouri’s Mid-Continent Nail Corporation spokesman James Glassman says ‘jobs are in severe jeopardy’ due to steel tariffs. If the company is not granted an exclusion, he said the company could move to Mexico or go out of business.” (“US Nail Company on ‘Brink of Extinction Because of Tariffs,” CNN, 6/26/18)

‘MISSOURI FARMERS SAY TRADE WAR THREATENING THEIR BUSINESS AND LEGACY.’ “Some Missouri farmers say they are losing money and are concerned they could lose their farms due to the Trade War with China. ‘I’ve been a farmer since 1951 and it looks like that maybe this might be that first year that we’re going in the red,’ said Dale Edmondson, an 87-year-old farmer in Polk County.  He says he has 7,000 bushels of soybeans from last year that haven’t yet been sold. ‘We’re at the mercy of the market,’ he said. ‘I have survived droughts. I have survived high interests. And I’ve survived a lot of things, but I don’t know whether we can survive this trade war or not.’” (Jennifer Abreu, “Missouri Farmers Say Trade War Threatening Their Business and Legacy,” OzarksFirst.com, 8/8/18)

HOG FARMERS FACE OPERATING LOSSES THANKS TO TARIFFS. “Due to the increased supply of pork this year coupled with the tariffs placed on pork exports to Mexico and China, prices are expected to drop significantly. ‘They estimate that this will further decrease the price by about $9 per head,’ Doherty said. ‘So, we are already looking at some kind of a loss per head going into late 2018 and then into 2019. Basically, it’s making a bad situation worse.’” (“Excess Pork Supply, Tariffs Mean Losses for Illinois Pork Farmers,” WQAD, 8/6/18)

TRADE WAR THREATENS $880 MILLION IN MISSOURI EXPORTS. “The Missouri Chamber of Commerce estimates the state could lose  $880 million because of this trade war.” (Jennifer Abreu, “Missouri Farmers Say Trade War Threatening Their Business and Legacy,” OzarksFirst.com, 8/8/18)

TRADE SUPPORTS MORE THAN 826,000 MISSOURI JOBS. (US Chamber of Commerce)

AMERICAN FARMERS ‘THE PRIMARY LOSERS’ AS FOREIGN COMPETITORS EAT UP OVERSEAS MARKETS. “Of the $20 billion in U.S. agricultural goods that went to China last year, more than half was in soybeans. China’s move sent U.S. soybean prices plunging nearly 20 percent, to the detriment of Midwestern farmers. But not everybody’s suffering. In a recent research note, economists from market-research firm TS Lombard observed that ‘global trading firms will easily skirt China’s soybean tariffs and leave U.S. growers the primary losers’ and that ‘the big winners will be Brazilian farmers and the big grain companies.’” (Editorial, “Meet the Winners of the Trade War,” Weekly Standard, 8/7/18)

Former Republican Congressman Dr. Charles Boustany to Join Tariffs Hurt the Heartland as Spokesman

Louisiana Congressman will help tell the stories of business owners, farmers and families hurt by the trade war as part of the growing nationwide, non-partisan campaign against tariffs

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE                                 Contact: [email protected]

(Washington, D.C.) – Tariffs Hurt the Heartland, the nationwide, non-partisan campaign against tariffs, today announced that former Republican Congressman Dr. Charles Boustany will join the campaign as a spokesman. Congressman Boustany is a trade expert with over a decade of experience working across party lines on trade policies in Congress, including on the House Ways and Means Committee. Dr. Boustany adds a powerful voice to the Tariffs Hurt the Heartland campaign that is holding town hall meetings on the tariff impact in communities across the country and airing ads across 11 states in the Midwest that describe the impact of tariff increases on consumers. The campaign has also launched an interactive map tracking the tariff impact on American employers.

“Every day that these tariffs remain in place the pain grows for American businesses, farmers and families,” Dr. Boustany said. “That’s why I’m looking forward to joining the Tariffs Hurt the Heartland campaign, which is telling the stories of the Americans who are paying these taxes through higher prices, deferred investments and lost opportunity. I believe that if we amplify the voices of these Americans we can reach policymakers on the Hill and in the White House.”

Congressman Boustany served Louisiana for 12 years in the U.S. House of Representatives. He served Louisiana’s 7th district from 2005-2013 and the 3rd district from 2013-2017. During his time in Congress, Dr. Boustany served on the House Ways and Means Committee, which oversees trade policy. As a member of the committee, Dr. Boustany established himself as a leader on trade policy. Boustany was a co-founder of the Friends of the Trans-Pacific Partnership Caucus. Dr. Boustany also authored trade enforcement language that created the tools for more effective trade enforcement in an effort to stop abusive practices. In the private sector, Dr. Boustany served as the President and CEO of his own private practice of medicine in the field of thoracic and cardiovascular surgery.

“You learn quickly in Congress that real change begins outside of the beltway, with the people whose lives are being impacted,” Dr. Boustany said. “That’s why this campaign is engaging at the grassroots level with town-hall style events that feature real Americans. I’m going to work to echo their concerns back here in D.C. to ensure that their voices are being heard in the halls of power.

“America needs a clear strategy for how and when this trade war comes to an end,” Dr. Boustany added. “Instead of doubling-down on tariffs that have not worked, it is time for meaningful negotiations to take place. In the months ahead, we urge the administration to use forums like the G-20 to engage trading partners in discussions on how we can hold trading partners accountable without hurting American families.”

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New Data on Tariff Impacts on Florida Released as President Trump Visits Sunshine State to Tout Economy

As he visits Florida today, President Trump should listen to Floridians bearing the costs of the trade war

This week Tariffs Hurt the Heartland, the nationwide grassroots campaign against tariffs, unveiled new data that showed how tariffs are directly impacting Florida’s economy. The statistics, which were compiled by The Trade Partnership, revealed that tariffs cost Florida businesses $122 million in the month of August alone. This represents a 49-percent increase in tariff-related costs compared to this point last year. These costs are borne directly by the hardworking Florida taxpayers that the administration promised to protect.

“When Florida businesses are hurt by higher tariffs, those costs are felt by every worker and family across they state,” said Tariffs Hurt the Heartland Spokesperson Brian Kuehl. “Tariffs cost jobs, raise prices for everyday goods, make it harder for small businesses to make and sell their products, and destroy export markets that farmers rely on to sell their commodities. Tariffs are hurting Florida’s economy, and that pain will only get worse as the trade war continues.”

Total Tariffs Paid by Florida Businesses Per Month

Total Tariffs Paid by Florida Businesses on Products Subject to Administration Tariffs through August

BACKGROUND

TARIFFS ARE HURTING FLORIDA’S #1 INDUSTRY – TOURISM. “Alana Holmstrom treks from Canada to Florida each year, staying for weeks at a time with her parents in Naples. But this year, her family — including her husband and 8-year-old daughter — are seriously considering traveling elsewhere. Many Canadians who live or visit Florida fear a trade war due to the increasingly strained relations with the U.S., with some deciding to boycott U.S. goods and vacations. ‘I love Naples and it feels like a second home, but it’s hard to visit when tensions are high,’ said Holmstrom, who originally was from Kenora, Ontario. ‘It’s more the principle of not going down. We are Canadians … we don’t fight with anyone.’” (Callie Schmidt, “Chill In The Air: Canadians In Florida Cancel Visits As Tensions With U.S. Snowball,” Naples Daily News, 6/20/18)

TARIFFS SQUEEZE FLORIDA CITRUS. “Recently, President Donald Trump’s tariffs and trade war have provoked the EU, Canada and China to impose an import tax on U.S. orange juice. While American exports of OJ have fallen 60 percent in the last five years, tariffs from some of its largest trading partners could kill America’s export industry, increase reliance on Brazil and raise OJ prices for Americans.” (Peter Chung, “How Brazil Stole The Production of Orange Juice From Florida,” CNBC, 8/23/18)

FLORIDA MANUFACTURERS FORCED TO CONSIDER LEAVING STATE TO AVOID TARIFFS. “There are countries other than China and the United States where companies can build electronics and loudspeakers. The tariffs on China will help those countries, rather than boosting business and manufacturing in the United States, [JL Audio Vice President Manville] Smith says. ‘If we can buy the same parts, from China or elsewhere, and build the products in another country, we avoid these high tariffs,’ Smith says. ‘We would much rather keep our production here in Florida, but we may not be able to if our own government keeps creating obstacles.’” (Reagan Haynes, “Trade War Troubles,” Trade Only Today, 10/26/18)

Tariffs Hurt the Heartland is backed by over 100 of the nation’s largest trade organizations that represent thousands of workers and businesses across the country. The campaign recently released an interactive, searchable map (TariffsHurt.com) that allows users to find stories across the country of how tariffs are impacting local communities. Learn more about the campaign here, or read about us in the New York TimesBloombergUSA Today and the Wall Street Journal. Join the conversation on Twitter using #TariffsHurt.

 

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