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News Archive

Month: January 2019

At South Carolina Town Hall, Data Reveals Massive Tariff Costs for Palmetto State

South Carolina businesses have now paid an extra $126 million thanks to Trump tariffs 

Most recent monthly data shows South Carolina businesses have paid $58 million in tariffs on products subject to new Trump tariffs; more than 7 times what was paid on the same products the previous year

Tariffs have a direct impact on South Carolina: In October, South Carolina exports subject to retaliation dropped 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
CONTACT: [email protected] or [email protected]  (Manning, SC) – Record-high tariffs have now cost South Carolina businesses $126 million, according to data discussed today at a trade town hall meeting in Manning. The data was originally released by Tariffs Hurt the Heartland—a nationwide grassroots campaign against tariffs—and compiled by the Trade Partnership, and includes a look at the full weight of tariffs that have been imposed on $200 billion in Chinese imports and the resulting retaliatory actions against American exports.

South Carolina businesses have now paid an extra $126 million in additional tariffs, including $58 million in October of last year. During that month, South Carolina businesses paid more than seven times the tariffs they paid on the same products at the same time last year.

“The tariffs have created great stress as the rush is on to find suitable products that can be sourced outside of China in the quantity and quality needed,” said Arnold KamlerChairman and CEO of Kent International Inc. “The related price increases have hurt our business as well as our customers.”

“We are concerned about the impact of tariffs on U.S. suppliers, customers and manufacturers; tariffs are not positive for the US economy,” said Sarah Thorn, Senior Director of Global Government Affairs for Walmart. “By 2023, Walmart has pledged to purchase approximately $250 billion in products that support the creation of American jobs, but the tariffs could have a dampening effect on our efforts to re-shore American manufacturing.” The staggering South Carolina numbers correspond with national data showing American businesses paid $6.2 billion in tariffs in October, the highest amount for any month in U.S. history. 

See the South Carolina State Impact Report HERE for more information.

At a town hall meeting at the Bicycle Corporation of America in Manning, SC, members of the business community, retailers, farmers, and trade experts discussed how tariffs are impacting their consumers; their ability to invest in their businesses; their exports; and the impact on jobs and hiring.

“Families and businesses in South Carolina and across the country are facing unprecedented costs thanks to tariffs imposed by Washington and retaliation by our trading partners,” said Jon Gold, Vice President of Supply Chain and Customs Policy for the National Retail Federation. “They’re counting on the administration to continue to negotiate and put an end to tit-for-tat tariffs before local communities suffer even more damage. “Imposing tariffs on imported goods will hit American consumers and businesses—including manufacturers, farmers, ranchers, and technology companies—with higher costs on commonly used products and materials,” said Brince Manning, Manager, Southeast Region, U.S. Chamber of Commerce. “Simply put, tariffs are a tax on American consumers and businesses, and are the wrong approach to address unfair trade practices.”

Though tariffs are billed by the administration as a way to reduce the trade deficit, export numbers reveal that the opposite is happening. Since the trade war began, South Carolina exports have faced $187 million in new retaliatory tariffs, including $52 million in October. As a result, South Carolina exports have dropped, threatening the state’s 496,100 jobs that are supported by trade.

“The trade war is having a real-world impact on South Carolina businesses, farmers, and workers. South Carolina businesses and taxpayers have already paid millions in tariffs that continue to threaten jobs and the economy. We must end the trade war to keep America competitive in the global marketplace and to protect jobs supported by trade here at home,” said Former Louisiana Congressman and Tariffs Hurt the Heartland spokesperson Dr. Charles Boustany.

Part of a larger series, the data discussed today is the latest segment of the monthly Tariff Tracker that Tariffs Hurt the Heartland has launched in conjunction with The Trade Partnership, who compiles monthly data released by the U.S. government. The monthly import data is calculated using data from the Census Bureau, and the monthly export data is compiled based on Census Bureau and U.S. Department of Agriculture data. As part of the Tariff Tracker project, Tariffs Hurt the Heartland is releasing data on how individual states have been impacted by increased import tariffs and declining exports.

Tariffs Hurt the Heartland is the nationwide, non-partisan campaign opposing tariffs that is supported by more than 150 trade associations from every industry. Tariffs Hurt the Heartland has been holding town hall meetings on the tariff impact of tariffs in communities across the country. The campaign is also airing ads across 11 states in the Midwest that describe the impact of tariff increases on consumers and has launched an interactive map tracking the tariff impact on American employers.

For additional information and data from the Tariff Tracker contact [email protected] or [email protected].

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NEW AD: Non-Profit that Provides Babies With ‘A Safe Place to Sleep’ Says Tariffs Put Babies at Risk

New Tariffs Hurt the Heartland ad tells the story of how tariffs have caused a Pittsburgh based non-profit called “Cribs for Kids” to reduce the amount of cribs they provide to low-income moms across the country

Cribs for Kids Executive Director Judith Bannon: “We never thought tariffs would affect us, but they do. President Trump says that China is paying these tariffs, but I see the cost on my invoices.”

WATCH THE NEW AD HERE: https://youtu.be/m_yvCtvJUpQ

(Washington, D.C.) – Tariffs Hurt the Heartland, the national grassroots campaign against tariffs, today released a new ad that illustrates the economic and human toll tariffs are taking across America. The spot, which features Judith Bannon, executive director of Cribs for Kids, tells the story of how tariffs are hurting the Pittsburgh-based non-profit’s ability to provide mothers with a safe place for their baby to sleep. The ad will run online in Pennsylvania, Ohio, Wisconsin and Washington D.C. starting next week – before and after the State of the Union address – and will run through the Trump administration’s March 1st deadline to negotiate a deal preventing an increase in tariffs to 25 percent. If the administration fails to get a deal, tariffs on the cribs described in the ad will rise to 25 percent. 

“Cribs for Kids makes sure that low income families throughout the country have a safe place for their babies to sleep,” Judith Bannon says in the 30 second spot. “To date, we have given out over 600,000 cribs. As a non-profit, we never thought tariffs would affect us but they do. President Trump says that China is paying these tariffs, but I see the cost on my invoices. A 10 percent increase in the tariff means that 10 percent more babies are at risk. President Trump, stop the trade war now.”

Since there is very little U.S. production of cribs, and no production that can be done at the scale or cost to provide free cribs to hundreds of thousands of mothers, Cribs for Kids must import the cribs they provide. Cribs for Kids then contracts with states, counties, hospitals and non-profits across the country who earmark specific spending levels for the number of cribs they can buy. Because new 10 percent tariffs have made cribs 10 percent more expensive to import, the states Cribs for Kids contracts with have had to purchase 10 percent fewer cribs. As Judith Bannon points out in the ad, this tariff increase has put 10 percent more babies at risk. 

“We’ve seen the pain from tariffs play out in a lot of ways, but this is among the most galling examples of how Americans are the victims of these tariffs,” Tariffs Hurt the Heartland spokesman and former Congressman Charles Boustany said. “Other countries aren’t the ones footing the bill, Americans are. Manufacturers, farmers, retailers, and even non-profits and the vulnerable Americans they serve are the ones being taxed. We encourage the administration to end this pain by negotiating a deal that takes tariff increases off the table for good, ends the threat of new tariffs, and finally brings an end to the crippling tariffs we are facing right now.”

Tariffs Hurt the Heartland is the nationwide, non-partisan campaign opposing tariffs that is supported by more than 200 organizations from every industry. Tariffs Hurt the Heartland has been holding town hall meetings on the tariff impact of tariffs in communities across the country. The campaign is also airing ads across 11 states in the Midwest that describe the impact of tariff increases on consumers and has launched an interactive map tracking the tariff impact on American employers.

To contact Judith Bannon, Executive Director of Cribs for Kids please email: [email protected].

To contact Tariffs Hurt the Heartland contact [email protected].

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The Markets Have Spoken: End the Trade War Before Damage Gets Worse

WASHINGTON – Officials from the United States and China are meeting this week for a second round of negotiations as they work toward a deal to end the trade war. The dispute between the two countries has lasted for months and its developments have created turmoil and uncertainty for the stock market. Everyday Americans watch their 401(k) plans tumble when leaders indicate the trade war will continue to drag on. As tariffs continue to hurt American businesses, workers, and families, the message from the markets is clear: the trade war needs to end before things get even worse.

NEW YORK TIMES: Trump ‘Spooking Stock Investors’ with ‘Tariff Man’ warning. “Stocks sank on Tuesday, as President Trump threatened China with further tariffs, just days after the two countries agreed to a cease-fire in their escalating economic conflict. Referring to himself as a ‘Tariff Man,’ Mr. Trump, in a series of tweets, deepened the murkiness surrounding the trade agreement, while members of his economic team talked down the prospects of a broad deal.” (New York Times, 12/4/18)

POLITICO: ‘Trump can’t have his tariffs and the stock market too.’ “President Donald Trump loves two things very much: tariffs and a rising stock market. It’s becoming increasingly clear he can’t have both…After markets soared in 2017, Wall Street hit a wall, with stocks dropping in recent weeks in part on fears that China and the U.S. will not reach an agreement by a March 1 deadline and Trump will slap tariffs as high as 25 percent on everything China exports to the U.S., inviting significant retaliation.” (Politico, 12/19/18)

FORBES: ‘Turmoil in the markets’ when Trump tweets about tariffs. “President Trump and China’s President Xi had dinner on Sunday at the G20 summit. Expectations were low going into it with a large concern that there could be a further deterioration in trade talks, and Trump would then impost 25% tariffs on pretty much all goods imported from China…However, since there was very little concrete agreed to and China didn’t release any official statements until Wednesday (when the U.S. stock markets were closed), Trump’s tweets, which included calling himself ‘Tariff Man,’ helped the Dow Jones crater almost 800 points, or 3.1%, on Tuesday.” (Forbes, 12/6/18)

CBO: Tariffs will slow U.S. economic growth. “Tariffs imposed by the Trump administration will limit growth of U.S. real gross domestic product by an average of 0.1 percent each year for the next 10 years if they remain in place at current levels, the Congressional Budget Office (CBO) said on Monday. The nonpartisan agency said growth of GDP – a measure national economic output – would be curbed by a drop in consumer spending power and a fall in U.S. exports.” (Reuters, 1/28/19)

PANTHEON MACROECONOMICS ECONOMIST: Trade war is ‘quickest possible route to a recession’ with ‘stock markets likely to tank as tariffs hit.’ “Ian Shepherdson, chief economist for Pantheon Macroeconomics, estimated the tariffs would constitute a tax hike of about 0.7 percent of GDP, ‘to say nothing of the cost of the disruption to supply chains.’ … ‘With stocks likely to tank as the tariffs hit, even without higher rates, it seems to us that broad, high tariffs on imports are the quickest possible route to a recession next year.’” (Washington Post, 10/30/18)

CRAMER: ‘Higher tariffs and higher interest rates are setting stocks up for a rough 2019’. “President Donald Trump’s tariffs on China and the Federal Reserve’s plans to hike interest rates in lockstep are both ‘toxic’ for the stock market, and combined, they are souring the prospects for 2019, CNBC’s Jim Cramer warned Monday. ‘Higher rates and higher [tariffs] are setting us up for a very difficult end of the year — not to mention 2019 — unless something’s done to ameliorate these two different houses of pain,’ the ‘Mad Money’ host said. (CNBC, 10/29/18)

  • ‘Mini version of 2008’ could be looming. “The only thing that can stop the market’s recent plunge is the Federal Reserve changing course on interest rates or President Donald Trump ending his tariffs, according to CNBC’s Jim Cramer. ‘My main fear is that we could have a mini version of 2008 if the Fed doesn’t change course,’ the ‘Mad Money’ host said Monday night.” (CNBC, 10/30/18)

TIAA WORLD MARKETS PRESIDENT: Trade developments pose ‘big risk’ for markets. “Investors have feared for most of the year that a protracted trade spat will lead to slower economic growth and diminishing profits for companies. ‘The big risk is still with trade and China,’ said Chris Gaffney, president of world markets at TIAA Bank, noting the market has not fully priced in the possibility of a protracted trade war with China.” (CNBC, 10/31/18)

CONTACT: 

Matt McAlvanah  ([email protected]

Or Melanie Lehnhardt ([email protected])

At Texas Town Hall, New Data Reveals Massive Tariff Costs for Lone Star State


Texas businesses have now paid an extra $1.1 billion thanks to Trump tariffs 

Most recent monthly data shows Texas businesses have paid $364 million in tariffs on products subject to new Trump tariffs; more than 12 times what was paid on the same products last year


  Tariffs have a direct impact on Southeast Texas: Port of Houston exports subject to retaliatory tariffs are down 47 percent in most recent month; exports not subject to retaliation rose 34 percent

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
CONTACT: [email protected] or [email protected] 

(Houston, TX) – Record-high tariffs have now cost Texas more than a billion dollars, according to new data released yesterday at a trade town hall meeting in Houston. The data was released by Tariffs Hurt the Heartland—a nationwide grassroots campaign against tariffs— and compiled by the Trade Partnership, and includes the first look at the full weight of tariffs that have been imposed on $200 billion in Chinese imports and the resulting retaliatory actions against American exports. Texas businesses have now paid an extra $1.1 billion in additional tariffs, including $364 million in October, the most recent month for which data is available. During that month, Texas businesses paid more than 12 times the tariffs they paid on the same products at the same time last year.

“Retailers rely on imported merchandise to provide American families products they need at prices they can afford,” said Texas Retailers Association President & CEO, George Kelemen. “From clothing to electronics, many consumer products are no longer mass-produced in the United States. Because of the trade war with China, local businesses are already feeling the impact of the tariffs. Faced with limited resources, small retailers have less control over their supply chains and cannot absorb higher costs from tariffs.” The record-setting Texas numbers correspond with new national data showing American businesses paid $6.2 billion in tariffs in October, the highest amount for any month in U.S. history.

See the Texas State Impact Report HERE for more information.

At a town hall meeting at the Petroleum Club of Houston, business owners, manufacturers, energy leaders and trade experts discussed the cost of tariffs for Texas businesses, workers and families, and called for a change in course for the country’s trade policy.

“The goal of the industry and policymakers should always be to keep high quality domestic manufacturing here in the United States, and PESA is very concerned that despite the best intentions, section 232 and 301 tariffs may have the opposite effect in relation to many areas of the energy industry,” said Petroleum Equipment & Services Association Vice President of Government Affairs, Tim Tarpley.

“Agriculture has been struggling for some time now. Net farm income has declined by more than half in the last five years,”said Texas Farm Bureau President, Russell Boening.“Against that economic backdrop, this trade war could not have come at a worse time. The Trump Administration assisted farmers with transition payments. That too, is appreciated, but it is no solution for the long term. Nothing can replace free and fair trade in agriculture’s economic equation.”

Though tariffs are billed by the administration as a way to reduce the trade deficit, export numbers reveal that the opposite is happening. Since the trade war began, Texas exports have faced $381 million in new retaliatory tariffs, including $107 million in October. As a result, Texas exports subject to retaliation have dropped 41 percent. Southeast Texas has been hit particularly hard by retaliatory tariffs, with Port of Houston exports subject to retaliatory tariffs dropping by 47 percent. Port exports not subject to retaliatory tariffs rose by 34 percent.

“Texas businesses are witnessing significant drops in exports as a result of the tariffs. These American businesses, farmers and financial markets are all reeling from these tariffs. Ending the trade war is essential to keeping America competitive in the global marketplace while growing our economy and the millions of jobs supported by trade here at home,” said Former Louisiana Congressman and Tariffs Hurt the Heartland spokesperson Dr. Charles Boustany.

Part of a larger series, the data released yesterday is the latest segment of the monthly Tariff Tracker that Tariffs Hurt the Heartland has launched in conjunction with The Trade Partnership, who compiles monthly data released by the U.S. government. The monthly import data is calculated using data from the Census Bureau, and the monthly export data is compiled based on Census Bureau and U.S. Department of Agriculture data. As part of the Tariff Tracker project, Tariffs Hurt the Heartland is releasing data on how individual states have been impacted by increased import tariffs and declining exports.

Tariffs Hurt the Heartland is the nationwide, non-partisan campaign opposing tariffs that is supported by more than 150 trade associations from every industry. Tariffs Hurt the Heartland has been holding town hall meetings on the tariff impact of tariffs in communities across the country. The campaign is also airing ads across 11 states in the Midwest that describe the impact of tariff increases on consumers and has launched an interactive map tracking the tariff impact on American employers.

For additional information and data from the Tariff Tracker contact [email protected] or [email protected].

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WATCH: Soybeans in Louisiana Rotting in Fields as a Result of the Trade War

(St. Martin Parish, LA) – Today, Tariffs Hurt the Heartland released a new video featuring a Lousiana soybean farmer who was forced to leave his crop rotting in the field as a result of the trade war. Due to the administration’s tariffs on $200 billion of Chinese products, soybean farmers in Louisiana and beyond are suffering the effects of China’s retaliatory tariffs on American exports. 

“We’ve had hurricanes before where it destroys a percentage of the crop, but this time we left a good crop,” said Louisiana soybean farmer, Daniel Richard. “Like one of my fellow friends said, it’s pretty depressing when you’re going to leave a crop in the field that’s 90% good.”

According to the video, farmers in Louisiana ran out of room to store soybeans waiting to be sold in their grain elevators because of the effect of tariffs on export prices. As a result, farmers were forced to leave their beans rotting in the field, which wasn’t a problem before. “It’s going to be a question of if we can maintain our operation going forward,” Daniel Richard added.

To request an interview with Daniel, please contact [email protected].

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Corn Refiners Association Joins Farmers for Free Trade

Today, the Corn Refiners Association (CRA), the national trade association representing the corn refining industry in the United States, announced that it has joined Farmers for Free Trade.

Farmers for Free Trade is a bipartisan campaign co-chaired by former Senators Richard Lugar and Max Baucus that is focused on amplifying the voices of American farmers, ranchers and agricultural businesses that support free trade. Farmers for Free Trade is currently working at the grassroots level to organize and educate farmers about the importance of trade, including through work at state commodity conventions, through state proclamations, by reaching farmers through social media, and by identifying local spokespeople, among other efforts. The Corn Refiners Association joins several other major commodity groups, including the American Farm Bureau, in partnering with Farmers for Free Trade to strengthen support for trade in rural America.

“America’s corn refiners, along with the rest of American agriculture, need trade policies that unlock access to new markets, break down trade barriers, and level the playing field so that American farmers can compete and win,” said John Bode, President and CEO of the Corn Refiners Association. “In 2019, Congressional ratification of the new U.S.-Mexico-Canada Agreement (USMCA) is a priority for us. Farmers for Free Trade has consistently shown that they’re committed to working with any partner, regardless of politics, to build support for trade policies at the grassroots level, where it’s needed most. The Corn Refiners Association is excited to partner with Farmers for Free Trade to continue to fight for policies that advance free trade, expand opportunities for our members, and help America feed a hungry world.”

“We are excited to have the Corn Refiners of America on board this rapidly expanding effort at a critical time for American ag exports,” said former Senator Richard Lugar. “America’s corn refiners are among the most export dependent groups and with their help we will look to build even more support for trade at the local and state level. Working with partners like the Corn Refiners we will be able to continue to advocate for trade policies that tear down barriers to trade.”

“For over a century the Corn Refiners Association has proven that they can mobilize support for the big issues that face their membership, particularly on trade,” said former Senator Max Baucus. “That’s why having them be part of Farmers for Free Trade is going to be so important in our efforts to reach the decision makers here in Washington D.C. Farmers for Free Trade has already proven that they can mobilize farmers to fight for trade policies that work, adding the Corn Refiners support to our effort will only bolster our work in the year to come.”

In 2019, Farmers for Free Trade will continue to focus on supporting trade policies that open new markets, including the U.S.-Mexico-Canada Agreement (USMCA) and potential new trade agreements with the EU, Japan, and UK. Farmers for Free Trade will also continue to work in a bipartisan way to express many in the ag community’s concern over tariff policies that have reduced export opportunities for farmers, ranchers, and rural communities.

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At Farm Show, New Data Reveals Pennsylvania Businesses Paying Massive Increase In Tariffs As Exports Plummet

Pennsylvania businesses have now paid an extra $271 million in import tariffs due to Trump tariffs 

Most recent monthly data shows Pennsylvania businesses have paid $95 million in tariffs on products subject to new Trump tariffs; more than nine times what was paid on the same products last year

Pennsylvania exports are also paying the price for trade war: exports subject to retaliation down 20%, thanks to $118 million in new retaliatory tariffs

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
CONTACT: [email protected] or [email protected] Harrisburg, PA – Record-high tariffs are hitting Pennsylvania hard, according to new data released yesterday at the Pennsylvania Farm Show by Tariffs Hurt the Heartland and compiled by The Trade Partnership. The data includes the first look at the full weight of tariffs that have been imposed on $200 billion in Chinese imports and the resulting retaliatory actions taken against American exports. In October 2018 (the most recent month available), Pennsylvania businesses paid $95 million in tariffs on products subject to Trump administration tariffs – more than nine times the amount paid in tariffs on the same products a year ago. Since new tariffs were imposed, Pennsylvania businesses have paid an extra $271 million in import tariffs.

See the Pennsylvania State Impact Report HERE for more information.

The record-setting Pennsylvania numbers correspond with new national data showing American businesses paid $6.2 billion in tariffs in October, the highest amount for any month in U.S. history.

“Tariffs are taking a toll on Pennsylvania farmers, workers, manufacturers, business owners and families,” said Farmers for Free Trade Co-Founder, Angela Hofmann. “Tariffs cost jobs, drive up prices, and make it harder for businesses to keep their doors open. The data shows that the trade war has failed to achieve any of the administration’s goals, but the costs continue to pile up in Pennsylvania and across the country.”

Though tariffs are billed by the administration as a way to reduce the trade deficit, export numbers reveal that the opposite is happening. Since the trade war began, Pennsylvania exports have faced $118 million in new retaliatory tariffs, including $35 million in October. As a result, Pennsylvania exports subject to retaliation have dropped 20 percent.

“Farmers rely on exports, but tariffs are making it harder for them to sell their commodities and making it easier for foreign competitors to take over export markets that Americans worked for years to develop,” Angela Hofmann added. “The damage caused to American agriculture by the trade war could be irreparable if the administration continues on its course.”

The data was released at the Pennsylvania Farm Show in Harrisburg. At the event, Tariffs Hurt the Heartland held a discussion featuring Farmers for Free Trade, the Pennsylvania State Grange and the Pennsylvania Farm Bureau.

Part of a larger series, the data released today is the latest segment of the monthly Tariff Tracker that Tariffs Hurt the Heartland has launched in conjunction with The Trade Partnership, who compiles monthly data released by the U.S. government. The monthly import data is calculated using data from the Census Bureau, and the monthly export data is compiled based on Census Bureau and U.S. Department of Agriculture data. As part of the Tariff Tracker project, Tariffs Hurt the Heartland is releasing data on how individual states have been impacted by increased import tariffs and declining exports.

Tariffs Hurt the Heartland is the nationwide, non-partisan campaign opposing tariffs that is supported by more than 150 trade associations from every industry. Tariffs Hurt the Heartland has been holding town hall meetings on the tariff impact of tariffs in communities across the country. The campaign is also airing ads across 11 states in the Midwest that describe the impact of tariff increases on consumers and has launched an interactive map tracking the tariff impact on American employers.

For additional information and data from the Tariff Tracker contact [email protected] or [email protected].

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